Women in Nanoscience

Subtitle

Women in Nano Blog

Women dominate new leadership positions in the American Physical Society: Jin, Stachel and Fleming

Posted on July 18, 2015 at 12:05 AM

Three women scientists have been elected to serve as chairs-elect of the APS nominating committee, International Councilor, and general councilor.


 

Dr. Deborah S. Jin, a Fellow of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and an adjunct professor of physics at the University of Colorado, Boulder, has been elected to chair-elect of APS nominating committee, assuming responsibility for the annual APS election. Dr. Jin's research focuses on studying behavior ultracold temperatures atomic gases. She is well-known for her work on creating the first ultracold gas of fermions and realizing a superfluid of paired fermions. Dr. Jin is a fellow of APS and a member of the National Academy of Sciences. She has received numerous awards which recognize her scientific contributions, including the Catherine T. MacArthur Fellowship, the Service to America Medal, and the L'Oreal-UNESCo Women in Science Award for North America.


 

Dr. Johanna Stachel, a professor of Experimental Physics at the University of Heidelberg, Director of the Physikalische Institut, and Dean and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Physics and Astronomy, has been elected to the position of International Councilor. Dr. Satchel's research is focused on studying nuclear structure physics, and intermediate energy heavy ion physics as well as the high energy ion physics. Satchel currently serves as the president of the German Physical Society, and has served on many national and international committee, including the Board of Physics and Astronomy of the National Research Council, Helsinki Institute of Physics, and CERN Scientific Policy Committee.


 

Dr. Bonnie T. Fleming, a professor of physics at Yale University has been elected to the role of General Councilor. Dr. Fleming's research is focused on developing next-generation, precision neutrino-detection techniques that allow scientists to pursue some of the most pressing questions in neutrino physics. Dr. Fleming is a fellow of APS, the Connecticut Academy of Science and Engineering, and a Kavli Frontier Fellow named by the National Academy of Sciences. Additionally, Dr. Fleming has been actively involved in promoting and encouraging the participation of women and girls in science, through programs like the APS Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics and Girls Science Investigations. She also received the 2001 Luise Meyer-Schutzmeister Award from the Association of Women in Science.


- Written by Eugene Choi, Edited by Paulette Clancy

(Photo credit: American Physical Society)

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